All Systems Go! Podcast – Episode 157

Build a Stronger Team Using Your Kolbe Score feat. Eryn Morgan

All Systems Go! Marketing Automation and Systems Building with Chris L. Davis
Build a Stronger Team Using Your Kolbe Score feat. Eryn Morgan
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Episode Description

Ep. 157 – In this weeks episode, Chris is joined by Eryn Morgan to discuss the power of the Kolbe assessment for understanding a person’s strengths and predicting their behavior in certain roles. Eryn breaks down Chris’ Kolbe score and explains the significance of each of the assessment’s 4 modes. By the end of this episode you’ll see how the Kolbe assessment can lead to better team dynamics and overall effectiveness. Don’t miss out on this game-changing episode for yourself and your team!

  • 3:56 – What the Kolbe assessment is
  • 7:57 – The power of truly understanding team dynamics
  • 11:54 – How to match team roles with their Kolbe strengths
  • 14:00 – Understanding your Kolbe score and what it means
  • 15:34 – Eryn breaks down the 4 modes of the Kolbe assessment
  • 27:29 – How Chris personally uses his Kolbe score for better team management

Narrator  0:00  

You’re listening to the all systems go podcast, the show that teaches you everything you need to know to put your business on autopilot. Learn how to deploy automated marketing and sale systems in your business the right way with your host, the professor of automation himself and founder of automation bridge, Chris Davis.

 

Chris Davis  0:31  

Welcome, everyone to another episode of The all systems go podcast. I’m your host, Chris L. Davis. And today, today, we get to talk about what I call the intangibles of business. Oftentimes, especially on this podcast, things get so tactical, how do I do this? And how can I automate this and what’s the result of that thing. And as much as we love automation to help people and replace people at some time, sometimes, you’re always going to need people. And I’ve been on the record of saying I am against the term solopreneur. I don’t judge you if you use it, but you are going to need help. You are going to need somebody at some point to help you along the way. So when it comes to picking that person, a lot of people don’t understand how you’re wired should impact who you pick, because they’re wired a certain way as well. So we have Eryn Morgan, to help us navigate this topic conversation and shed some light. She is the CEO and founder of ego plus mouse LLC, the creator of CEO instincts and a Kobe certified business consultant, which is extremely important, because we’re going to talk about what Kobe is, if you haven’t heard of it, everyone, she helps powerful decision makers to nurture, manage and lead people by leveraging their cognitive instincts.

 

Chris Davis  2:08  

Okay, so without further ado, welcome to the podcast. Eryn, how’re you doing? 

 

Eryn Morgan  2:17  

I’m amazing, Chris, thanks for having me. 

 

Chris Davis  2:19  

Yes, yes, it’s great to have you, of course, give everybody a little bit of insight on exactly how you landed in this space doing what you’re doing. 

 

Eryn Morgan  2:33  

Sure. So I discovered Kobe in late 2016. So I’ve known about this a long, long time. And it has become something that has just unlocked people for me in a in a really cool way. So I decided to really allow my consulting work to be based in Kobe as as one of my core tools. But I just I love helping people understand themselves and helping them understand collaborations with others.

 

Eryn Morgan  3:06  

And so I just decided that double down let’s let’s go all in with.

 

Chris Davis  3:11  

And was this was this always a thing? We did you in your younger years? Did you? Did you see signs that kind of hinted or foretold that perhaps this area with with helping people come together more effectively? Were you like that friend that was always Hey, guys, wait a minute, stop. Let’s come together. It doesn’t have to be this. This difficult. What? Were there any signs you say? Or is this something that kind of developed over time?

 

Eryn Morgan  3:42  

Yeah, you know, this is so funny. I, the place I went is I went to the one area in my life where I was not a team player. And that was in high school, when you’d get put on a group project. And I don’t know about you, but I always got put with people who maybe just didn’t want to give quite as much effort. Right? So they it wasn’t just quite as important to them as it was to me. So I would end up doing all the work. And I think back to that, and think, gosh, wouldn’t it have been amazing if we had known about donation at that point, and been able to form groups based on each person’s instinctive strengths, the way they’re going to take action when the vapin really cool. So I actually had negative experiences with team and with group, which caused me to look for a different way to interact and collaborate with people and so Colby for me has been the link to putting together amazing teams that are cohesive and creative and just really fluid in the way they work together. But it’s also great for one on one kind of interpersonal relationships to

 

Chris Davis  4:49  

Okay, all right. So so let’s jump into it. You mentioned the word Colby. And I am a I don’t want to say like an assessment MIT junkie, but I love learning about myself. Because what I found Eryn is, the better I understand me, and know me, the better I can be for others. And not to get too deep Eryn, but even this, this has like a therapist twist to it as well. Because a lot of times when you’re in relationship with people, and this doesn’t even have to be your significant other, this could be your best friend, you know, somebody that you work with, a lot of times we project and don’t even realize that we’re projecting either our insecurities, our traumas, our whatever the case may be onto other people. And then we’re judging them and how they receive and respond to our projections. So without getting them in the therapist chair, but let me say this, I’ve the thing that has continued to serve me well, as a leader of people, not a leader in this space and anything like that. But a leader of people is the fact that I take the time, and I’m intentional with learning about myself and how I’m wired. So I can show up better for others and set the proper expectations around that. So Kobe has been instrumental in that. And I want to give you the floor and talk about what is Kobe? How is it spelled? So people like what is that they may be searching right now? What is it and how does it differ from the other assessments in the marketplace?

 

Eryn Morgan  6:34  

Sure. Okay, so Colby is spelled K O, L be. And the primary index, the first one people generally take is the Colby a so the Colby a index. And what makes it what makes Colby different is that first of all, it’s the only assessment that measures the third part of the mind, which is the cognitive piece, the CO nation that we talked about, we use that word earlier. So we typically hear of personality assessments. And those are actually measuring a different part of our brain when they are capturing that information about us. So a personality test measures the effective piece of our mind. It’s all about what we want to do. And it does evolve as we evolve, it evolves and changes as we grow and are influenced by different people in our lives and take in new inputs, you can and I think we would all agree our personalities evolve as we as we age. The other piece of the mind is the cognitive piece, cognitive is all about what you can do or your skills. So we think back to those quizzes we take in high school, like what career Should I have, right? That’s really going towards more of that cognitive and ability side. So that’s where most people stop, they stop with cognitive and affective. And that’s the end of it. But cognitive, this third piece is not only incredibly solid, that you can, you can count on it over time. It doesn’t change, but it really measures what you will do. So if cognitive is what you can do, and effective is what you want to do. Cognitive is what you will do. And so it is a predicting, I can use it to predict a way a person’s going to show up in a certain role for a team, let’s say, because there are certain traits that go along with being a certain profile with Colby. And so there are things we can count on. And it’s good stuff, great, amazing strengths that people have. And when you know those strengths, then you can leverage them. And it’s a great way to put a team together because it is so reliable and it is so consistent and unchanging.

 

Chris Davis  8:55  

Wow, wow. Yes. Okay. It’s a lot. So let’s let’s walk through it. A lot of times when when you’re taking an assessment, there’s like a, what do you call it? Kind of like a personality profile or whatnot? Sure. Kobe was the first one where you actually gave me numbers. And that was like, oh, wait a minute, what do these numbers mean? And in we’re gonna go over the numbers in a minute. And when you know these numbers, you there are a lot of people I’ve witnessed after Kobe, though I didn’t see it beforehand, will have it in like their email signature, part of a conversation of somebody if they’ve taken the Kobe assessment, they, they’ll tell you their number, and you’ll know exactly what type of person that they are. So talk about the number rubric or I don’t know what it’s called, what do you call that? That ID or that that

 

Eryn Morgan  9:59  

There are our modes, and there are zones. And so there are four modes. So each person will have four numbers, the order of those numbers when you present them to somebody else, the order of those numbers matters. And so each of those four numbers is on a sliding scale of one to 10. It’s not one being bad 10 being amazing. It’s just a is essentially a continuum that has different strengths. So if there are four modes, and each of those modes has three zones, so three times four is 12. So there are 12. In when you look at a grid, you’ll see each of the four columns divided into three, and you’re going to land somewhere between one and 10 in each of those four columns. And so those and when you know about COBie for yourself, you understand what the numbers mean, for you. But until you’ve really dive in with a Kolbe consultant, or somebody who knows it more deeply, you don’t necessarily with the number know what the numbers mean, for other people, unless you’ve had that extra level of, of sort of education around it. So it can be a little confusing for people at first.

 

Chris Davis  11:09  

Yes, and I’ll say this, again, I’ve taken take taking many assessments, and I’m very familiar with my my personality type and everything. It was spot on. For one, let me say that for one, but two, is this the level of depth in describing the zones and what the numbers meant? I felt was extremely unique. Because a lot of times like I’ve done the DISC assessment, I’ve done some, I think a Myers Briggs, I’ve done like, I’ve done a whole bunch of them. I don’t even remember the name of them. But they, they do give you a nice comprehensive definition. But the Kobe, it was almost like, yes, that’s how I am. Oh, yes, that is what I would do. Right, like, even before doing it, and then it started to show me other personality types that would work well with me, and how to work well with these other personality types. So I thought the thoroughness of the delivery of results was really I actually haven’t since I’ve taken the Colby test. So I’ve taken assessments before it. It was unmatched. And now that I’ve taken the Colby, it’s still unmatched thing I’ve taken a couple more after that. Is that something that you hear people say often, all the time,

 

Eryn Morgan  12:37  

and not only because of the thoroughness, but what it what it means when you understand your Colby, and also then somebody else’s is that you start to be able to know, what are they going to do? It’s so action based, it’s so tangible, that you can actually take the information you learn. So even when I think back to like my Myers Briggs, and it’s great. And what do I do with that? Right? What are we it’s fantastic. And there are people who are trained in helping you do something with that. But on a day to day basis, it doesn’t really matter. To me, as much as a Colby assessment would in terms of action. I mean, and I can give I’ve so many stories, I can tell you so many stories about this, but but in understanding how other people are wired, there’s just nothing like that for number D code doesn’t mean they’re going to do it every now it’s not like it’s a fortune cookie, right? Or crystal ball, but to a certain degree, like I know what you’re going to do. And I know how team members are going to interact with you when you are your best self, and what that’s going to look like and so it is unmatched. For me. It’s the reason that I spent the time energy money effort to actually become certified because this thing unlocks. It can unlock everything. It really can.

 

Chris Davis  14:00  

Yeah, and I want to give my listeners All right. All right, everybody, I’m going to put myself on the on the operating table here. And I’m going to share my Colby score. And then Eryn just do a quick overview nothing too deep of exactly what that means. And so my score I memorize it as 88238823

 

Eryn Morgan  14:22  

Right okay. So what that tells me when I look at those numbers is the first thing is that you are a strategic planner. So you are somebody who is going to gather information and put it in systems and gather information and put it in systems you love consistency and getting things to a place where they are steady and stable. And you are brilliant in the sort of intangible space of of creating online in a in a virtual environment where you don’t have that tactile touch and feel. So I look at somebody like you. And I think if I partner you up with someone like me, who my default is to take action, I’m gonna go out and I’m going to innovate and create. And you put the two of us together in a team full failure, we’re gonna really extra bag because you are, you’re so incredibly good at creating complex systems that solve very, very detailed problems, such as subject matter expert, it’s so fun. Does that sound about right?

 

Chris Davis  15:34  

And that was spot on. And when I read it, I was like, did she write this herself? Because you know, we know each other, you’ve gone through my program, we spent some time. So let’s go number by number. What was the first the first eight? Is that a zone? Or what do you call that?

 

Eryn Morgan  15:53  

First eight is factfinder. This is all about how to gather and share information. So the higher that number on a scale of one to 10, the more detailed you are, in terms of research, and really becoming that deep subject matter expert. So you will you will share step by step detail information. I mean, you’re the person in the meeting, who has researched and knows all of that, you know, like, you know, like, you know, you’re done. And, and that we can contrast with somebody who was lower in terms of the number who is less inclined towards detail, they like summaries, brevity, maybe they know just enough to be able to stay stay engaged in a meeting. But they’re not going to be the person you call on when you really need to go deep. And somebody like me as a four, I sort of bridge that gap, I can, I can do detail, we can go there, or I can do that very summary kind of information. But these people and you as an factfinder, you initiated in factfinder, you’re pretty deep in terms of detail.

 

Chris Davis  17:07  

Okay, so that’s the fact finder, that’s the first eight, the first thing then the second number, I had eight and what was that?

 

Eryn Morgan  17:14  

That is Kobe calls it follow through, I call it stumps. Because it’s all about how you arrange data, how you how you create and arrange data. So this for you as an eight, again, a very high number, you are a system builder, you would like to create systems detailed, you know, project plan, step by step, you really go deep in this area. And so with for you, you might be able to do the 27 step checklist, right, and you’re an engineer to so that that to me by training, right? I think back to that, like this really matches where somebody like me on the lower end, I am I am closer to being a system breaker. So if you give me the directions, I will follow them. I’m not supposed to be good at at building systems that are detailed and complex, but I also will break the system. So there are people in the world who are those adapt, they like to adapt systems, they like to break systems in a good way. And so you are a builder and I will maintain

 

Chris Davis  18:30  

beautiful Alright, so we got systems was the second then the third number was my to what was that?

 

Eryn Morgan  18:38  

That is Quickstart. And so Quickstart is really about innovation and and how you take on risk and uncertainty. So as a to your you are all about stabilizing stabilization, finding things that stay steady and stable and consistent. And so this is really something I see a lot in that strategic planner is that ah too. It’s I’m going to do the research, build the system and then I just want things to maintain that steady pace, right steady. Hey,

 

Chris Davis  19:14  

my language.

 

Eryn Morgan  19:16  

Yeah, I know. And and then you have somebody like me as an eight, right? So I’m all the way on the other end. And I’m like, let’s go let’s try things. Let’s innovate, let’s be creative in how we approach because I mean, I’ve got the rent more than once. I mean, that is just how I’m wired to be. And so we’re very different in that way. And, and I will say this because this is a really good one to illustrate the two and eight. We’re really far apart in number and the further apart you are in number and this goes for any column but in our case, this one is a really good illustrator. The further you are, the more potential there is for conflict in terms of color. collaborative working arrangements. So you’re going to want to steady stable, keep the beat. And I’m going to want to go out and do new stuff. And we’re going to be in that where we just we don’t always meet Eye to Eye unless we know this. And we work together in order to bridge that gap.

 

Chris Davis  20:16  

That’s so good. Eryn, I want to share a story that this highlights this just brought back to my memory. And this was a recent one, I won’t say the name, but there was somebody who came into my outstay my ecosystem. And I mean, I could tell immediately, just a rabbit just bouncing around, you know, not waiting for the email that has the login to go, you know, just where’s it? Where’s it doo doo doo doo doo? And I could feel it, I could feel the friction of me trying to slow this person down and say, Hey, wait a minute, do this, then this, then this? And they were just like, oh, no, no, where were and before you know it, they were gone before I could even really, you know, like, capture him. But it was that dynamic of exactly what you said, you have the steady, make sure it’s going well researched, and the hey, let’s just get it done. And a lot of people don’t understand that these are your customers or your type of customer, you, there may be a certain Colby score, that you want to turn away with your marketing and your sales, right. And then when you start to see that behavior, what it helped me do is talk about the personality of someone without talking about the person. Right? So I can say, Man, that her personality is really frictional. It’s just, there’s just not her as a person or him as a person. It’s the personality. And once I know I like to be in the driver’s seat. Once I know your personality, or your your your Colby score, I then can sheet I’m doing air quotes. Everybody who’s just thought audio, I can cheat the system and treat you better. Yes, because I know so okay, I know you’re the you’re the rabbit, let me get you a carrot. I don’t have many, I only have like two or three. But let me give you this carrot. And then hopefully that will by some grace for you to slow down just a little bit. I don’t need you to slow down permanently, just a little bit to catch on with the systems and things that are in place. And then go again. It’s why

 

Eryn Morgan  22:33  

oh, so often in in our online kind of entrepreneurial, entrepreneurial business world, we talk about quick wins.

 

Chris Davis  22:39  

Yeah.

 

Eryn Morgan  22:42  

Or a lot of entrepreneurs who have this initiation style like I do, where are the rabbits, and you got to capture our attention and get us that quick win. And that doesn’t mean that others don’t appreciate a quick win. But people who are wired like you are understand the process of Okay, first we’re going to research this really get into understanding and then we’re going to build this out. And to you that makes total sense. But to somebody like me, I’m like, oh my god, I just I gotta get to the I gotta get to the next thing, right? So it really finding that bridge between and we’ll talk more about bridge in a second. But so let’s go and talk about the last number.

 

Chris Davis  23:20  

Yep, the last number for me, everyone, if you’re if you forgot is three. So we did eight two, we did the first eight factfinder. The second number was systems. The third number was what was it again? Like start with start. And now we’re at my last one, which is three, I believe. Yeah.

 

Eryn Morgan  23:38  

This one is a really fun one. And I have a good story on this one. The final column is implementer. And this one deals with space and tangibles. And so when we think about implementer, you and I are both threes. So what that means is that we can visualize a solution without having to really touch and feel that solution. So this is great people are in the online world. And I mean, the internet exists, but it really doesn’t. Right. So this is all in our in our minds that we’re creating these outcomes in a in a really a 2d environment. Yeah. Contrast that with somebody who has a higher number. They are very tactile, they need to touch and feel it right. And I use sometimes I have a coffee cup on my desk. It’s the perfect example. Right? You’re here we have one, right? If an implementer is not involved in this project, and you and I are involved in making this coffee cup, you know what’s gonna happen, handle is gonna fall off, right? Because we’re not the kinds of people that have that tactile touch and feel, to the way that we initiate our action and the way that we interact with the world. So an implementer they love that touch and feel the tangible nature of things. And so one of the ways that I actually that I in my life I said, I actually saw this work because implementers in virtual world, sometimes don’t get a lot of love. If you’re in production of any kind, if you make stuff, you need a high, not a highlight 789 10, that kind of person on your team, because that’s your quality control, that’s making sure you’re a well made handcrafted, that they work the way they should, when they come off that assembly line that they’re actually solid, right. And one of the things that I didn’t know about my husband, and once he learned his Colby score, it really unlocked everything for me is he has to interact with the world, when he is listening to me sort of I say, like, do my download on my day, he can’t just sit and listen to me, he has to do something. So the thought what I found is that he wants to put away the dishes, or he’s, you know, tidying up the kitchen. And I thought to myself at first, why can you just sit here and listen to me, like, bring attention to me. But it was actually the way he was interacting with the information he was receiving. He had, he was putting a light touch and feel piece to the whole process of us having a conversation. And when I understood that about the way he likes to interact immediately, it changed the way our relationship dynamic, because he needs space, he needs to interact, you know? And I say, Oh, can you imagine this thing we’re going to build and, and he goes out to the garage and gets, you know, a scrap piece of wood and a hammer and I’m gone like, can’t we just imagine it? No, no, he has to build it. Right? So when I understood that about it, now I have this much greater appreciation for the way he needs to interact with me in terms of our collaboration. So I don’t like to leave the implementers out because they’re they’re good. They’re good people who do amazing work in the world. We just don’t see them quite as much online in those highlights those higher numbers.

 

Chris Davis  26:53  

Yeah, I would it be fair to say like my, my brother and my father, work with their hands a lot. So my brother does carpentry my father was alive. And he did you know, like the electrical power lines and all of that. They would they have been higher on the implementer scale?

 

Eryn Morgan  27:14  

Yes, very likely. It’s it’s a good indicator when somebody works with their hands, that they and sometimes they couple up with other with other Colby strengths to create some really interesting combinations. But yeah, I typically do see that.

 

Chris Davis  27:29  

Got it. Got it. So so everybody, you see how I’m wired. And what I so what I did with this, what I did with this, Erin was was I looked at my team, my podcast manager, my assistants, and my operations manager and my freelancers for graphic design and things of that nature. And though they haven’t taken the score, I can all or though they don’t have a score, I can always knowing how I’m wired and you know, just understanding people in general, I can see how they’re wired. So sometimes, if I’m dealing with someone, like there’s one person on my team, that is probably my counterpart, I mean, I shouldn’t say my counterpart, more like my twin, eight, eight to three, right? So I know, if you leave us to our own devices, we’ll get down to the details of a thing. And it’d be a long meeting. And we’ll walk away with it and not really have many things in many boxes check, right. So because they’re that way, I know I need to decrease in my, my Fact Finder, I need to decrease in my factfinder. And I have to decrease in my systems, so that I can be who me who I need to be to make sure this meeting gets done effectively. Now, if that drained you, if you’re tired of that, then you may want to get somebody on your team that complements you. So you can sit back and let them do it. But I know how to communicate effectively with every single person on my team. And because of it, we operate at such a great efficiency. You know, I would argue that my team gets more done collaboratively than most companies 10 times my size or five times or three times. And it’s because of that Colby score has been an instrumental piece in that. And as we’re talking about this era, and I’m realizing I should officially get everybody on my team to take that score. Is that Is that something that you see often do do companies, businesses, enterprises, organizations, reach out to you when one person has has taken and say, hey, I want my whole team to take this is that something that happens frequently?

 

Eryn Morgan  30:00  

Yeah, it happens a lot. And it and it’s some of the most fun work that we get to do. Because there are usually two scenarios where that happens. So the first scenario is, oh, this is so cool. Let’s use this as enrichment. Let’s use this to enhance. So things are good, how could things be better. And that’s where sometimes we might identify, like the way that you describe that, you know, I need to pull those numbers down in order to get everybody that you’re essentially being what I like to call a bridge. So you’re coming to the middle of the column, so that everybody ultimately can get what they need to move the ball forward, right. And so some people don’t have the level of self awareness that you do in this space where they go, Okay, I gotta turn me down a little in order to help everybody win. So in those situations, I’ll have companies say, hey, I need a bridge, can you hire that facilitator type, to help bridge us and get things done, that translate a role. So that’s one camp, which is I love those, those experiences where we’re making it better, we’re dialing in an even more, the flip side of it is, stuff isn’t working, things are things are breaking, there are problems, communication, people are quitting, and all that friction around people in business. And I get called in into those situations a lot to try to sort the problems out and figure out and it’s never a person who’s a problem, it’s always a communication gap between people that is, is typically the issue we find. And once we understand it, then we can start to give skills and training and opportunities for them to strengthen in that area. And sometimes there’s a person missing, and sometimes the person is just not a good fit for the role. That level of awareness helps us to sort out teams and yes, it’s what I do all day, every day.

 

Chris Davis  31:55  

Yeah, this is a, this has been great, just revisiting all of this. And the reason why I did it is, again, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been brought into a company to provide some technical strategy, some marketing strategy, and it can’t be effectively executed, or put into place. Because of people. They have somebody on on on there on the team that they don’t necessarily know how to work with. And they happen to be my point that I’m instructing do this, this and that. So I just wanted to make sure we gave the appropriate light to this subject. Because yes, I love technology. Yes, I love strategy and marketing and making it all come together. But at the end of the day, there’s still people that you’re going to need to be able to leverage effectively, starting with yourself, yes, bridging yourself effectively.

 

Eryn Morgan  33:04  

And that’s one of the cool things about actually having your team members take the assessment. Because sometimes what we see is that somebody is in a role, that they know how you sometimes just sort of fall into something and you ended up in a role and, and you know, more responsibility gets sort of added to your and before you know it, you’re doing a thing, but you’re not actually wired to do that thing. You don’t you you are adapting to it. And you are, you know, flexing and you are sort of molding and shaping into the place where you need to be in order to be successful. But it’s not how you’re naturally wired. And so that causes a ton of stress for the for the person who’s having to perform that role. And then you couple up with somebody who is saying, hey, I need you to do XY and Z making certain assumptions about what that role would be, typically, and that person is that so that we have additional tools that we use to assess that stuff, for individuals for their position in terms of how they see their roles, but also how the leadership team sees their role. There are a lot of different tools that we can use. We don’t always go that deep. When it’s a smaller company, that I see that a lot with bigger, bigger companies, a lot more people. But that’s one of the things that I tend to I know all the I know the telltale signs. And even I try not to guess because people are people adapt when they have to when they’re in situations of stress or or challenge they’ll just don’t do what they got to do. Right. So we always want to remember that maybe the way they’re presenting isn’t necessarily the way they’re wired. And it’s a really cool thing to be able to help someone go oh, I’m not supposed to be in a role like this. This is why I’m struggling so much and and so it’s a good gift to give some Buddy, that sucks. And you end up with with an answer like this that can really change your life.

 

Chris Davis  35:05  

Yeah. Which is a good segue, I want to give you the floor here. As we come to a close, Eryn. There’s a listener or two or 10 or 20. That said, I need that. Yesterday, I believe that is part of the solution of what the problem that has been plaguing me personally, our company, our organization, where can somebody find out more about getting in contact with you and perhaps taking the COBie assessment?

 

Eryn Morgan  35:34  

Yeah, well, I have a website, it’s my name, erynmorgan.com. And that’s a great place to learn a little bit more about me, you can take the Colby with me as your guide, it’s the it’s the experience you’d get on colby.com, which anybody can go there just to learn a little bit more, see if it’s a good fit for their company, or for themselves. But working with me, I’m gonna guide you and give you additional insights based on my experience. So that’s where I love to start the conversation that and my LinkedIn, which is my primary social platform, where I like to spend time and this is just like, I, I just I’m so grateful that I get a chance to talk about this, that I get to open people up to learning more. So I hope that I’ll get to connect with some of your listeners first, because that would be amazing.

 

Chris Davis  36:22  

Yes, absolutely. Oh, all of those links, as usual will be in the show notes. Eryn, thank you so much for coming onto the podcast, and and helping us you know what you did today. Eryn, you helped us be better to ourselves first so we can be better to others. Forever.

 

Eryn Morgan  36:45  

Well, my pleasure. My pleasure. Thanks so much for having me.

 

Chris Davis  36:49  

Yes, yes. Thank you so much. And I’ll see you online Eryn.

 

Eryn Morgan  36:52  

All right, Chris, take care.

 

Chris Davis  36:54  

Thank you for tuning in to this episode of The all systems go podcast. If you enjoyed it, make sure that you’re subscribed at the time of recording the all systems go podcast is free to subscribe to, and it can be found in Apple podcasts, Google podcasts, YouTube, or wherever you get your podcasts new episodes are released every Thursday. So make sure you’re subscribed so that you don’t miss out and while you’re at it, please leave us a five star rating and review to show some love but also to help future listeners more easily find the podcast so they can experience the value of goodness as well. We’ve compiled all resources mentioned on the podcast, as well as other resources that are extremely valuable and effective at helping you grow your marketing automation skills quickly. And you can access them all at allsystemsgopodcast.com Thanks again for listening. And until next time, I see you online. Automate responsibly, my friends

 

Narrator  0:00  

You’re listening to the all systems go podcast, the show that teaches you everything you need to know to put your business on autopilot. Learn how to deploy automated marketing and sale systems in your business the right way with your host, the professor of automation himself and founder of automation bridge, Chris Davis.

 

Chris Davis  0:31  

Welcome, everyone to another episode of The all systems go podcast. I’m your host, Chris L. Davis. And today, today, we get to talk about what I call the intangibles of business. Oftentimes, especially on this podcast, things get so tactical, how do I do this? And how can I automate this and what’s the result of that thing. And as much as we love automation to help people and replace people at some time, sometimes, you’re always going to need people. And I’ve been on the record of saying I am against the term solopreneur. I don’t judge you if you use it, but you are going to need help. You are going to need somebody at some point to help you along the way. So when it comes to picking that person, a lot of people don’t understand how you’re wired should impact who you pick, because they’re wired a certain way as well. So we have Eryn Morgan, to help us navigate this topic conversation and shed some light. She is the CEO and founder of ego plus mouse LLC, the creator of CEO instincts and a Kobe certified business consultant, which is extremely important, because we’re going to talk about what Kobe is, if you haven’t heard of it, everyone, she helps powerful decision makers to nurture, manage and lead people by leveraging their cognitive instincts.

 

Chris Davis  2:08  

Okay, so without further ado, welcome to the podcast. Eryn, how’re you doing? 

 

Eryn Morgan  2:17  

I’m amazing, Chris, thanks for having me. 

 

Chris Davis  2:19  

Yes, yes, it’s great to have you, of course, give everybody a little bit of insight on exactly how you landed in this space doing what you’re doing. 

 

Eryn Morgan  2:33  

Sure. So I discovered Kobe in late 2016. So I’ve known about this a long, long time. And it has become something that has just unlocked people for me in a in a really cool way. So I decided to really allow my consulting work to be based in Kobe as as one of my core tools. But I just I love helping people understand themselves and helping them understand collaborations with others.

 

Eryn Morgan  3:06  

And so I just decided that double down let’s let’s go all in with.

 

Chris Davis  3:11  

And was this was this always a thing? We did you in your younger years? Did you? Did you see signs that kind of hinted or foretold that perhaps this area with with helping people come together more effectively? Were you like that friend that was always Hey, guys, wait a minute, stop. Let’s come together. It doesn’t have to be this. This difficult. What? Were there any signs you say? Or is this something that kind of developed over time?

 

Eryn Morgan  3:42  

Yeah, you know, this is so funny. I, the place I went is I went to the one area in my life where I was not a team player. And that was in high school, when you’d get put on a group project. And I don’t know about you, but I always got put with people who maybe just didn’t want to give quite as much effort. Right? So they it wasn’t just quite as important to them as it was to me. So I would end up doing all the work. And I think back to that, and think, gosh, wouldn’t it have been amazing if we had known about donation at that point, and been able to form groups based on each person’s instinctive strengths, the way they’re going to take action when the vapin really cool. So I actually had negative experiences with team and with group, which caused me to look for a different way to interact and collaborate with people and so Colby for me has been the link to putting together amazing teams that are cohesive and creative and just really fluid in the way they work together. But it’s also great for one on one kind of interpersonal relationships to

 

Chris Davis  4:49  

Okay, all right. So so let’s jump into it. You mentioned the word Colby. And I am a I don’t want to say like an assessment MIT junkie, but I love learning about myself. Because what I found Eryn is, the better I understand me, and know me, the better I can be for others. And not to get too deep Eryn, but even this, this has like a therapist twist to it as well. Because a lot of times when you’re in relationship with people, and this doesn’t even have to be your significant other, this could be your best friend, you know, somebody that you work with, a lot of times we project and don’t even realize that we’re projecting either our insecurities, our traumas, our whatever the case may be onto other people. And then we’re judging them and how they receive and respond to our projections. So without getting them in the therapist chair, but let me say this, I’ve the thing that has continued to serve me well, as a leader of people, not a leader in this space and anything like that. But a leader of people is the fact that I take the time, and I’m intentional with learning about myself and how I’m wired. So I can show up better for others and set the proper expectations around that. So Kobe has been instrumental in that. And I want to give you the floor and talk about what is Kobe? How is it spelled? So people like what is that they may be searching right now? What is it and how does it differ from the other assessments in the marketplace?

 

Eryn Morgan  6:34  

Sure. Okay, so Colby is spelled K O, L be. And the primary index, the first one people generally take is the Colby a so the Colby a index. And what makes it what makes Colby different is that first of all, it’s the only assessment that measures the third part of the mind, which is the cognitive piece, the CO nation that we talked about, we use that word earlier. So we typically hear of personality assessments. And those are actually measuring a different part of our brain when they are capturing that information about us. So a personality test measures the effective piece of our mind. It’s all about what we want to do. And it does evolve as we evolve, it evolves and changes as we grow and are influenced by different people in our lives and take in new inputs, you can and I think we would all agree our personalities evolve as we as we age. The other piece of the mind is the cognitive piece, cognitive is all about what you can do or your skills. So we think back to those quizzes we take in high school, like what career Should I have, right? That’s really going towards more of that cognitive and ability side. So that’s where most people stop, they stop with cognitive and affective. And that’s the end of it. But cognitive, this third piece is not only incredibly solid, that you can, you can count on it over time. It doesn’t change, but it really measures what you will do. So if cognitive is what you can do, and effective is what you want to do. Cognitive is what you will do. And so it is a predicting, I can use it to predict a way a person’s going to show up in a certain role for a team, let’s say, because there are certain traits that go along with being a certain profile with Colby. And so there are things we can count on. And it’s good stuff, great, amazing strengths that people have. And when you know those strengths, then you can leverage them. And it’s a great way to put a team together because it is so reliable and it is so consistent and unchanging.

 

Chris Davis  8:55  

Wow, wow. Yes. Okay. It’s a lot. So let’s let’s walk through it. A lot of times when when you’re taking an assessment, there’s like a, what do you call it? Kind of like a personality profile or whatnot? Sure. Kobe was the first one where you actually gave me numbers. And that was like, oh, wait a minute, what do these numbers mean? And in we’re gonna go over the numbers in a minute. And when you know these numbers, you there are a lot of people I’ve witnessed after Kobe, though I didn’t see it beforehand, will have it in like their email signature, part of a conversation of somebody if they’ve taken the Kobe assessment, they, they’ll tell you their number, and you’ll know exactly what type of person that they are. So talk about the number rubric or I don’t know what it’s called, what do you call that? That ID or that that

 

Eryn Morgan  9:59  

There are our modes, and there are zones. And so there are four modes. So each person will have four numbers, the order of those numbers when you present them to somebody else, the order of those numbers matters. And so each of those four numbers is on a sliding scale of one to 10. It’s not one being bad 10 being amazing. It’s just a is essentially a continuum that has different strengths. So if there are four modes, and each of those modes has three zones, so three times four is 12. So there are 12. In when you look at a grid, you’ll see each of the four columns divided into three, and you’re going to land somewhere between one and 10 in each of those four columns. And so those and when you know about COBie for yourself, you understand what the numbers mean, for you. But until you’ve really dive in with a Kolbe consultant, or somebody who knows it more deeply, you don’t necessarily with the number know what the numbers mean, for other people, unless you’ve had that extra level of, of sort of education around it. So it can be a little confusing for people at first.

 

Chris Davis  11:09  

Yes, and I’ll say this, again, I’ve taken take taking many assessments, and I’m very familiar with my my personality type and everything. It was spot on. For one, let me say that for one, but two, is this the level of depth in describing the zones and what the numbers meant? I felt was extremely unique. Because a lot of times like I’ve done the DISC assessment, I’ve done some, I think a Myers Briggs, I’ve done like, I’ve done a whole bunch of them. I don’t even remember the name of them. But they, they do give you a nice comprehensive definition. But the Kobe, it was almost like, yes, that’s how I am. Oh, yes, that is what I would do. Right, like, even before doing it, and then it started to show me other personality types that would work well with me, and how to work well with these other personality types. So I thought the thoroughness of the delivery of results was really I actually haven’t since I’ve taken the Colby test. So I’ve taken assessments before it. It was unmatched. And now that I’ve taken the Colby, it’s still unmatched thing I’ve taken a couple more after that. Is that something that you hear people say often, all the time,

 

Eryn Morgan  12:37  

and not only because of the thoroughness, but what it what it means when you understand your Colby, and also then somebody else’s is that you start to be able to know, what are they going to do? It’s so action based, it’s so tangible, that you can actually take the information you learn. So even when I think back to like my Myers Briggs, and it’s great. And what do I do with that? Right? What are we it’s fantastic. And there are people who are trained in helping you do something with that. But on a day to day basis, it doesn’t really matter. To me, as much as a Colby assessment would in terms of action. I mean, and I can give I’ve so many stories, I can tell you so many stories about this, but but in understanding how other people are wired, there’s just nothing like that for number D code doesn’t mean they’re going to do it every now it’s not like it’s a fortune cookie, right? Or crystal ball, but to a certain degree, like I know what you’re going to do. And I know how team members are going to interact with you when you are your best self, and what that’s going to look like and so it is unmatched. For me. It’s the reason that I spent the time energy money effort to actually become certified because this thing unlocks. It can unlock everything. It really can.

 

Chris Davis  14:00  

Yeah, and I want to give my listeners All right. All right, everybody, I’m going to put myself on the on the operating table here. And I’m going to share my Colby score. And then Eryn just do a quick overview nothing too deep of exactly what that means. And so my score I memorize it as 88238823

 

Eryn Morgan  14:22  

Right okay. So what that tells me when I look at those numbers is the first thing is that you are a strategic planner. So you are somebody who is going to gather information and put it in systems and gather information and put it in systems you love consistency and getting things to a place where they are steady and stable. And you are brilliant in the sort of intangible space of of creating online in a in a virtual environment where you don’t have that tactile touch and feel. So I look at somebody like you. And I think if I partner you up with someone like me, who my default is to take action, I’m gonna go out and I’m going to innovate and create. And you put the two of us together in a team full failure, we’re gonna really extra bag because you are, you’re so incredibly good at creating complex systems that solve very, very detailed problems, such as subject matter expert, it’s so fun. Does that sound about right?

 

Chris Davis  15:34  

And that was spot on. And when I read it, I was like, did she write this herself? Because you know, we know each other, you’ve gone through my program, we spent some time. So let’s go number by number. What was the first the first eight? Is that a zone? Or what do you call that?

 

Eryn Morgan  15:53  

First eight is factfinder. This is all about how to gather and share information. So the higher that number on a scale of one to 10, the more detailed you are, in terms of research, and really becoming that deep subject matter expert. So you will you will share step by step detail information. I mean, you’re the person in the meeting, who has researched and knows all of that, you know, like, you know, like, you know, you’re done. And, and that we can contrast with somebody who was lower in terms of the number who is less inclined towards detail, they like summaries, brevity, maybe they know just enough to be able to stay stay engaged in a meeting. But they’re not going to be the person you call on when you really need to go deep. And somebody like me as a four, I sort of bridge that gap, I can, I can do detail, we can go there, or I can do that very summary kind of information. But these people and you as an factfinder, you initiated in factfinder, you’re pretty deep in terms of detail.

 

Chris Davis  17:07  

Okay, so that’s the fact finder, that’s the first eight, the first thing then the second number, I had eight and what was that?

 

Eryn Morgan  17:14  

That is Kobe calls it follow through, I call it stumps. Because it’s all about how you arrange data, how you how you create and arrange data. So this for you as an eight, again, a very high number, you are a system builder, you would like to create systems detailed, you know, project plan, step by step, you really go deep in this area. And so with for you, you might be able to do the 27 step checklist, right, and you’re an engineer to so that that to me by training, right? I think back to that, like this really matches where somebody like me on the lower end, I am I am closer to being a system breaker. So if you give me the directions, I will follow them. I’m not supposed to be good at at building systems that are detailed and complex, but I also will break the system. So there are people in the world who are those adapt, they like to adapt systems, they like to break systems in a good way. And so you are a builder and I will maintain

 

Chris Davis  18:30  

beautiful Alright, so we got systems was the second then the third number was my to what was that?

 

Eryn Morgan  18:38  

That is Quickstart. And so Quickstart is really about innovation and and how you take on risk and uncertainty. So as a to your you are all about stabilizing stabilization, finding things that stay steady and stable and consistent. And so this is really something I see a lot in that strategic planner is that ah too. It’s I’m going to do the research, build the system and then I just want things to maintain that steady pace, right steady. Hey,

 

Chris Davis  19:14  

my language.

 

Eryn Morgan  19:16  

Yeah, I know. And and then you have somebody like me as an eight, right? So I’m all the way on the other end. And I’m like, let’s go let’s try things. Let’s innovate, let’s be creative in how we approach because I mean, I’ve got the rent more than once. I mean, that is just how I’m wired to be. And so we’re very different in that way. And, and I will say this because this is a really good one to illustrate the two and eight. We’re really far apart in number and the further apart you are in number and this goes for any column but in our case, this one is a really good illustrator. The further you are, the more potential there is for conflict in terms of color. collaborative working arrangements. So you’re going to want to steady stable, keep the beat. And I’m going to want to go out and do new stuff. And we’re going to be in that where we just we don’t always meet Eye to Eye unless we know this. And we work together in order to bridge that gap.

 

Chris Davis  20:16  

That’s so good. Eryn, I want to share a story that this highlights this just brought back to my memory. And this was a recent one, I won’t say the name, but there was somebody who came into my outstay my ecosystem. And I mean, I could tell immediately, just a rabbit just bouncing around, you know, not waiting for the email that has the login to go, you know, just where’s it? Where’s it doo doo doo doo doo? And I could feel it, I could feel the friction of me trying to slow this person down and say, Hey, wait a minute, do this, then this, then this? And they were just like, oh, no, no, where were and before you know it, they were gone before I could even really, you know, like, capture him. But it was that dynamic of exactly what you said, you have the steady, make sure it’s going well researched, and the hey, let’s just get it done. And a lot of people don’t understand that these are your customers or your type of customer, you, there may be a certain Colby score, that you want to turn away with your marketing and your sales, right. And then when you start to see that behavior, what it helped me do is talk about the personality of someone without talking about the person. Right? So I can say, Man, that her personality is really frictional. It’s just, there’s just not her as a person or him as a person. It’s the personality. And once I know I like to be in the driver’s seat. Once I know your personality, or your your your Colby score, I then can sheet I’m doing air quotes. Everybody who’s just thought audio, I can cheat the system and treat you better. Yes, because I know so okay, I know you’re the you’re the rabbit, let me get you a carrot. I don’t have many, I only have like two or three. But let me give you this carrot. And then hopefully that will by some grace for you to slow down just a little bit. I don’t need you to slow down permanently, just a little bit to catch on with the systems and things that are in place. And then go again. It’s why

 

Eryn Morgan  22:33  

oh, so often in in our online kind of entrepreneurial, entrepreneurial business world, we talk about quick wins.

 

Chris Davis  22:39  

Yeah.

 

Eryn Morgan  22:42  

Or a lot of entrepreneurs who have this initiation style like I do, where are the rabbits, and you got to capture our attention and get us that quick win. And that doesn’t mean that others don’t appreciate a quick win. But people who are wired like you are understand the process of Okay, first we’re going to research this really get into understanding and then we’re going to build this out. And to you that makes total sense. But to somebody like me, I’m like, oh my god, I just I gotta get to the I gotta get to the next thing, right? So it really finding that bridge between and we’ll talk more about bridge in a second. But so let’s go and talk about the last number.

 

Chris Davis  23:20  

Yep, the last number for me, everyone, if you’re if you forgot is three. So we did eight two, we did the first eight factfinder. The second number was systems. The third number was what was it again? Like start with start. And now we’re at my last one, which is three, I believe. Yeah.

 

Eryn Morgan  23:38  

This one is a really fun one. And I have a good story on this one. The final column is implementer. And this one deals with space and tangibles. And so when we think about implementer, you and I are both threes. So what that means is that we can visualize a solution without having to really touch and feel that solution. So this is great people are in the online world. And I mean, the internet exists, but it really doesn’t. Right. So this is all in our in our minds that we’re creating these outcomes in a in a really a 2d environment. Yeah. Contrast that with somebody who has a higher number. They are very tactile, they need to touch and feel it right. And I use sometimes I have a coffee cup on my desk. It’s the perfect example. Right? You’re here we have one, right? If an implementer is not involved in this project, and you and I are involved in making this coffee cup, you know what’s gonna happen, handle is gonna fall off, right? Because we’re not the kinds of people that have that tactile touch and feel, to the way that we initiate our action and the way that we interact with the world. So an implementer they love that touch and feel the tangible nature of things. And so one of the ways that I actually that I in my life I said, I actually saw this work because implementers in virtual world, sometimes don’t get a lot of love. If you’re in production of any kind, if you make stuff, you need a high, not a highlight 789 10, that kind of person on your team, because that’s your quality control, that’s making sure you’re a well made handcrafted, that they work the way they should, when they come off that assembly line that they’re actually solid, right. And one of the things that I didn’t know about my husband, and once he learned his Colby score, it really unlocked everything for me is he has to interact with the world, when he is listening to me sort of I say, like, do my download on my day, he can’t just sit and listen to me, he has to do something. So the thought what I found is that he wants to put away the dishes, or he’s, you know, tidying up the kitchen. And I thought to myself at first, why can you just sit here and listen to me, like, bring attention to me. But it was actually the way he was interacting with the information he was receiving. He had, he was putting a light touch and feel piece to the whole process of us having a conversation. And when I understood that about the way he likes to interact immediately, it changed the way our relationship dynamic, because he needs space, he needs to interact, you know? And I say, Oh, can you imagine this thing we’re going to build and, and he goes out to the garage and gets, you know, a scrap piece of wood and a hammer and I’m gone like, can’t we just imagine it? No, no, he has to build it. Right? So when I understood that about it, now I have this much greater appreciation for the way he needs to interact with me in terms of our collaboration. So I don’t like to leave the implementers out because they’re they’re good. They’re good people who do amazing work in the world. We just don’t see them quite as much online in those highlights those higher numbers.

 

Chris Davis  26:53  

Yeah, I would it be fair to say like my, my brother and my father, work with their hands a lot. So my brother does carpentry my father was alive. And he did you know, like the electrical power lines and all of that. They would they have been higher on the implementer scale?

 

Eryn Morgan  27:14  

Yes, very likely. It’s it’s a good indicator when somebody works with their hands, that they and sometimes they couple up with other with other Colby strengths to create some really interesting combinations. But yeah, I typically do see that.

 

Chris Davis  27:29  

Got it. Got it. So so everybody, you see how I’m wired. And what I so what I did with this, what I did with this, Erin was was I looked at my team, my podcast manager, my assistants, and my operations manager and my freelancers for graphic design and things of that nature. And though they haven’t taken the score, I can all or though they don’t have a score, I can always knowing how I’m wired and you know, just understanding people in general, I can see how they’re wired. So sometimes, if I’m dealing with someone, like there’s one person on my team, that is probably my counterpart, I mean, I shouldn’t say my counterpart, more like my twin, eight, eight to three, right? So I know, if you leave us to our own devices, we’ll get down to the details of a thing. And it’d be a long meeting. And we’ll walk away with it and not really have many things in many boxes check, right. So because they’re that way, I know I need to decrease in my, my Fact Finder, I need to decrease in my factfinder. And I have to decrease in my systems, so that I can be who me who I need to be to make sure this meeting gets done effectively. Now, if that drained you, if you’re tired of that, then you may want to get somebody on your team that complements you. So you can sit back and let them do it. But I know how to communicate effectively with every single person on my team. And because of it, we operate at such a great efficiency. You know, I would argue that my team gets more done collaboratively than most companies 10 times my size or five times or three times. And it’s because of that Colby score has been an instrumental piece in that. And as we’re talking about this era, and I’m realizing I should officially get everybody on my team to take that score. Is that Is that something that you see often do do companies, businesses, enterprises, organizations, reach out to you when one person has has taken and say, hey, I want my whole team to take this is that something that happens frequently?

 

Eryn Morgan  30:00  

Yeah, it happens a lot. And it and it’s some of the most fun work that we get to do. Because there are usually two scenarios where that happens. So the first scenario is, oh, this is so cool. Let’s use this as enrichment. Let’s use this to enhance. So things are good, how could things be better. And that’s where sometimes we might identify, like the way that you describe that, you know, I need to pull those numbers down in order to get everybody that you’re essentially being what I like to call a bridge. So you’re coming to the middle of the column, so that everybody ultimately can get what they need to move the ball forward, right. And so some people don’t have the level of self awareness that you do in this space where they go, Okay, I gotta turn me down a little in order to help everybody win. So in those situations, I’ll have companies say, hey, I need a bridge, can you hire that facilitator type, to help bridge us and get things done, that translate a role. So that’s one camp, which is I love those, those experiences where we’re making it better, we’re dialing in an even more, the flip side of it is, stuff isn’t working, things are things are breaking, there are problems, communication, people are quitting, and all that friction around people in business. And I get called in into those situations a lot to try to sort the problems out and figure out and it’s never a person who’s a problem, it’s always a communication gap between people that is, is typically the issue we find. And once we understand it, then we can start to give skills and training and opportunities for them to strengthen in that area. And sometimes there’s a person missing, and sometimes the person is just not a good fit for the role. That level of awareness helps us to sort out teams and yes, it’s what I do all day, every day.

 

Chris Davis  31:55  

Yeah, this is a, this has been great, just revisiting all of this. And the reason why I did it is, again, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been brought into a company to provide some technical strategy, some marketing strategy, and it can’t be effectively executed, or put into place. Because of people. They have somebody on on on there on the team that they don’t necessarily know how to work with. And they happen to be my point that I’m instructing do this, this and that. So I just wanted to make sure we gave the appropriate light to this subject. Because yes, I love technology. Yes, I love strategy and marketing and making it all come together. But at the end of the day, there’s still people that you’re going to need to be able to leverage effectively, starting with yourself, yes, bridging yourself effectively.

 

Eryn Morgan  33:04  

And that’s one of the cool things about actually having your team members take the assessment. Because sometimes what we see is that somebody is in a role, that they know how you sometimes just sort of fall into something and you ended up in a role and, and you know, more responsibility gets sort of added to your and before you know it, you’re doing a thing, but you’re not actually wired to do that thing. You don’t you you are adapting to it. And you are, you know, flexing and you are sort of molding and shaping into the place where you need to be in order to be successful. But it’s not how you’re naturally wired. And so that causes a ton of stress for the for the person who’s having to perform that role. And then you couple up with somebody who is saying, hey, I need you to do XY and Z making certain assumptions about what that role would be, typically, and that person is that so that we have additional tools that we use to assess that stuff, for individuals for their position in terms of how they see their roles, but also how the leadership team sees their role. There are a lot of different tools that we can use. We don’t always go that deep. When it’s a smaller company, that I see that a lot with bigger, bigger companies, a lot more people. But that’s one of the things that I tend to I know all the I know the telltale signs. And even I try not to guess because people are people adapt when they have to when they’re in situations of stress or or challenge they’ll just don’t do what they got to do. Right. So we always want to remember that maybe the way they’re presenting isn’t necessarily the way they’re wired. And it’s a really cool thing to be able to help someone go oh, I’m not supposed to be in a role like this. This is why I’m struggling so much and and so it’s a good gift to give some Buddy, that sucks. And you end up with with an answer like this that can really change your life.

 

Chris Davis  35:05  

Yeah. Which is a good segue, I want to give you the floor here. As we come to a close, Eryn. There’s a listener or two or 10 or 20. That said, I need that. Yesterday, I believe that is part of the solution of what the problem that has been plaguing me personally, our company, our organization, where can somebody find out more about getting in contact with you and perhaps taking the COBie assessment?

 

Eryn Morgan  35:34  

Yeah, well, I have a website, it’s my name, erynmorgan.com. And that’s a great place to learn a little bit more about me, you can take the Colby with me as your guide, it’s the it’s the experience you’d get on colby.com, which anybody can go there just to learn a little bit more, see if it’s a good fit for their company, or for themselves. But working with me, I’m gonna guide you and give you additional insights based on my experience. So that’s where I love to start the conversation that and my LinkedIn, which is my primary social platform, where I like to spend time and this is just like, I, I just I’m so grateful that I get a chance to talk about this, that I get to open people up to learning more. So I hope that I’ll get to connect with some of your listeners first, because that would be amazing.

 

Chris Davis  36:22  

Yes, absolutely. Oh, all of those links, as usual will be in the show notes. Eryn, thank you so much for coming onto the podcast, and and helping us you know what you did today. Eryn, you helped us be better to ourselves first so we can be better to others. Forever.

 

Eryn Morgan  36:45  

Well, my pleasure. My pleasure. Thanks so much for having me.

 

Chris Davis  36:49  

Yes, yes. Thank you so much. And I’ll see you online Eryn.

 

Eryn Morgan  36:52  

All right, Chris, take care.

 

Chris Davis  36:54  

Thank you for tuning in to this episode of The all systems go podcast. If you enjoyed it, make sure that you’re subscribed at the time of recording the all systems go podcast is free to subscribe to, and it can be found in Apple podcasts, Google podcasts, YouTube, or wherever you get your podcasts new episodes are released every Thursday. So make sure you’re subscribed so that you don’t miss out and while you’re at it, please leave us a five star rating and review to show some love but also to help future listeners more easily find the podcast so they can experience the value of goodness as well. We’ve compiled all resources mentioned on the podcast, as well as other resources that are extremely valuable and effective at helping you grow your marketing automation skills quickly. And you can access them all at allsystemsgopodcast.com Thanks again for listening. And until next time, I see you online. Automate responsibly, my friends

 

Today’s Guest

Eryn Morgan is the CEO and Founder of Eagle + Mouse, LLC, creator of #CEOInstincts™, and a Kolbe Certified™ business consultant. She helps powerful decision makers to nurture, manage, and lead people by leveraging their conative instincts. Since 2009, Eryn has been a strategic thought partner and fractional COO for over 400 business owners, NYT best-selling authors, corporate leaders, educators, and entrepreneurs. She’s been a featured guest expert in ThriveMind with Tasha Booth and Digital Insiders with Julie Stoian, and has presented countless small group workshops for creative professionals that foster communication and collaboration.

Resources Mentioned

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About the Show

On the show, Chris reveals all of his automated marketing strategies he has learned from working in fast growing marketing technology startups so you can put your business on autopilot quickly and without error.

Discover how to deploy automated marketing, sales, and delivery systems to scale your business without working long hours to do so.

Chris L. Davis - Chief Automation Officer

YOUR HOST

Chris L. Davis

Chris is an Electrical Engineer turned entrepreneur who is the Founder of Automation Bridge, an international speaker and facilitator, and startup consultant